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"Yorkshire landscape" by David Hockney by Martin Beek on Flickr.Via Flickr:
Landscape 1997. In the late 1990’s David Hockney returned to Yorkshire, this resulted in a series of high-key landscapes such as this. The colours do not seem to reflect the muted  tones of English landscape or indeed the weather often associated with such places. As with his other work they have elements of cubism and have a very strong decorative content.
Back in the 1960sDavid Hockney was the bleached-blond rebel who electrified the art scene. He was Britain’s answer to Andy Warhol. Today, at 73, David Hockney is one of the pre-eminent artists living in the UK and is anything but retired. In the past years he has become a prolific landscape painter. 
Five years ago he returned from sunny California to settle down in Yorkshire. While he used to paint Californian landscapes by the dozens his current subject is the English landscape of his childhood, but on an American scale. 
In a TV programme Hockney said that these landscapes were as much about memory as observation, indeed he brought up the interesting point that all landscape is about memory. HIs work in this genre has gone on for twelve years working on a huge scale and with watercolour and in recent times digital imagery. Hockney’s work is about the way he sees and what it is to see, be it through the lens, eye or through sensation and feeling itself. He is a painter who has had a lasting impression upon me. My recent set on The Camera and the artist is an extension of some of his ideas.
In 2012 Hockney wiil exhibit a large body of Yorkshire landscapes at The Royal Academy. His landscape work has deeply influenced my own recent series of drawings based on Ipsden Oxfordshire.http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfordshire_church_photos/sets/72157626827304866/
As with David Hockney’s Yorkshire landscapes I’ve returned time and time again to work and observe the landscape drawing it almost daily.

"Yorkshire landscape" by David Hockney by Martin Beek on Flickr.

Via Flickr:
Landscape 1997. In the late 1990’s David Hockney returned to Yorkshire, this resulted in a series of high-key landscapes such as this. The colours do not seem to reflect the muted tones of English landscape or indeed the weather often associated with such places. As with his other work they have elements of cubism and have a very strong decorative content.
Back in the 1960sDavid Hockney was the bleached-blond rebel who electrified the art scene. He was Britain’s answer to Andy Warhol. Today, at 73, David Hockney is one of the pre-eminent artists living in the UK and is anything but retired. In the past years he has become a prolific landscape painter.

Five years ago he returned from sunny California to settle down in Yorkshire. While he used to paint Californian landscapes by the dozens his current subject is the English landscape of his childhood, but on an American scale.

In a TV programme Hockney said that these landscapes were as much about memory as observation, indeed he brought up the interesting point that all landscape is about memory. HIs work in this genre has gone on for twelve years working on a huge scale and with watercolour and in recent times digital imagery. Hockney’s work is about the way he sees and what it is to see, be it through the lens, eye or through sensation and feeling itself. He is a painter who has had a lasting impression upon me. My recent set on The Camera and the artist is an extension of some of his ideas.

In 2012 Hockney wiil exhibit a large body of Yorkshire landscapes at The Royal Academy. His landscape work has deeply influenced my own recent series of drawings based on Ipsden Oxfordshire.http://www.flickr.com/photos/oxfordshire_church_photos/sets/72157626827304866/
As with David Hockney’s Yorkshire landscapes I’ve returned time and time again to work and observe the landscape drawing it almost daily.

  1. tatiana7766 posted this